Right Steps & Poui Trees


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Thank You, Blood Donors! #GiveBlood #GiveNow #GiveOften #WBDD2017

More than thirty years ago, as a newborn, my son had a medical challenge that meant he needed a complete blood transfusion. Many family members and friends gave blood on his behalf, but none of them had his blood type, which is not a common type in Jamaica. There were no units of that blood type in the blood bank system at the time, which was obviously very frightening for us.Blood types in Jamaica However, the staff at the blood collection centre at the University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI) knew of a blood donor with that blood type on campus. They contacted her and asked if she would be willing to make a donation and she was. My son had his blood transfusion, which gave his tiny body a better chance of overcoming the challenges he faced. And all these years later, he is a healthy, grown man, making his contribution to society!

Over the years, I have thought with gratitude of that blood donor who willingly answered the call she got, and in doing so gave an invaluable gift to my son, me and my family. My son has become a blood donor himself and a few times we have actually gone together to the collection centre at UHWI to make blood donations. It’s a way of passing the gift along.

So today on World Blood Donor Day 2017, I’d like to celebrate all those who give blood, and to support the campaign message to #GiveBlood, #GiveNow, #GiveOftenWorld Blood Donor Day 14-6-17And if you aren’t able to donate blood yourself, share the message and encourage others to donate!

Check out the National Blood Transfusion Service website to get more information about giving blood in Jamaica.Blood collection centresHave a look at the PAHO/WHO web page to find more information about blood donation in the region.blood donation in Americas 2017And in ending, I want to congratulate my youngest brother, David, who is a long-term, repeat blood donor.  He has given blood more frequently than anyone else I know personally and his commitment is very inspiring!World blood donor day 2017.PNG

 


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Jamaica: Ministry of Health #Zika Virus Update – June 2, 2016

Last week Thursday morning (June 2, 2016), the Ministry of Health (MOH) held a press briefing to give an update on the current situation regarding the zika virus outbreak in Jamaica. Minister of Health, Dr Christopher Tufton, made an initial statement and was supported during the question and answer session  by MOH Permanent Secretary, Dr Kevin Harvey & Chief Medical Officer, Dr Winston De La Haye. Also participating in the briefing was Dr Noreen Jack, PAHO/WHO representative in Jamaica.

moh 2-6-16

L to R: Dr De La Haye, Minister Tufton, Dr Harvey

Dr Tufton first gave his statement, the text of which can be seen on the MOH website, but he and others gave additional information during the briefing. He has also posted the link to his Periscope video of the briefing on his Facebook page. (The video does not contain the entire briefing; however, it contains a substantial amount.) Below is some of the information given during the briefing.

Ministry of Health Zika statistics as of May 29, 2016

  • 1969 notifications
  • 1387 notifications fit the case definition for suspected zika
  • 465 suspected cases in Kingston & St Andrew
  • 405 suspected cases in St Catherine
  • 787 samples tested
  • 403 test results received
  • 16 positives for zika, with lab test confirmation
  • 6 additional preliminary positives now being retested
  • 2 pregnant women have tested positive
  • all 16 positive cases have fully recovered

Dr Tufton said that 16 confirmed cases doesn’t reflect the reality on the ground, which is why the MOH is also giving the numbers of suspected cases at this time.

MOH zika briefing 2-6-16 Tufton ab

The MOH is also investigating clusters of people with rash that is suspected to be zika; these reports are coming primarily from the parishes of Kingston, St Catherine, Westmoreland and Clarendon.

Microcephaly & Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS)

At the briefing, an update was given on the two main complications of zika infection which have been of concern to the MOH, as they have been to the global community – microcephaly and GBS.  So far there have been no confirmed cases of microcephaly or GBS linked to zika virus in Jamaica.

Microcephaly

  • 1 case of microcephaly reported; on investigation  found to be negative for zika. Woman would have become pregnant before zika reported in island.
  • Dr Harvey noted that there is no baseline data for microcephaly in Jamaica, as it is not a reportable condition.
  • MOH is now going back and doing docket searches to establish a baseline.
  • The head circumference of all babies born in medical facilities is now being measured.
  • MOH will be monitoring carefully, particularly from September onwards, which will be 9 months since first confirmed case of zika.

GBS

  • 7 cases of GBS are currently being managed; 3 at Spanish Town Hospital, 3 at Kingston Public Hospital (KPH) & 1 at University Hospital of the West Indies (UHWI).
  • Results as at June 1, 2016 showed that the patient at UHWI and 2 of the patients at Spanish Town Hospital are zika negative.
  • Since start of 2016, MOH has been actively searching for cases of GBS. So far 13 investigated, 6 of which also tested negative for zika.
  • Dr Tufton cautioned that a negative zika test does not absolutely rule out zika association, due to the short window of 3 to 5 days for testing.

Going Forward: The 2nd Phase of the Outbreak

During the second phase of its activities, the Minister indicated that there will be more focus on pregnant women and their partners, as well as those who develop severe complications such as GBS. The MOH will continue “to engage the population and stress the importance of taking personal responsibility.”

Among the activities listed were the following:

  • Employing 1000 temporary workers to support the public health team in engaging in island-wide community vector control and public education activities.
  • Hosting island-wide education sessions working through agencies such as the Social Development Commission, Neighbourhood Watch and the police to get to communities.
  • Continuing the monitoring of pregnant women at the community level throughout their pregnancies including providing them with educational support.
  • Providing 20,000 bed nets over six months to all pregnant women who visit antenatal clinics; these nets have been obtained with the help of Food for the Poor.
  • Carrying out Vector Control activities through ‘fogging’ and larvicidal activities.
  • Conducting heightened House to House Surveillance in sections of the population where the infection has been notified and/or confirmed.
  • Working with the international partners such as PAHO/WHO/CARPHA/CDC to ensure that MOH actions are aligned with international standards and best practices.

moh ps harvey 2-6-16Dr Harvey noted that reporting of zika cases is currently a manual process, but that the MOH is working on a web-based form, which it intends to roll out in a couple of weeks. moh dlh 2-6-16Dr De La Haye indicated that some doctors have said that they find the form long & that a review is underway. He also reiterated that the MOH doesn’t wait for confirmation of zika cases before it takes action, but acts on reports of suspected cases. He said that some doctors have indicated that they are seeing as many as 20-25 cases of zika per day.

One question from a reporter was whether there has been a decrease in the number of pregnancies, given the MOH advice to women earlier this year to delay pregnancies. Dr Harvey responded that what is counted is births, and so any such decrease could only be noted later in the year. (Dr Tufton had indicated earlier in the briefing that there are approximately 40,000 births annually in Jamaica.)

moh who rep 2 2-6-16

The Olympic Games in Brazil

In response to a question, Dr Tufton said that the MOH did have concerns about our athletes going to the Olympics and continued to monitor the international debate regarding postponement of the games, though not a part of such discussions. He said that the MOH would be proactive in ensuring that athletes and supporters were given appropriate information and support, and that they understood the risks. On their return, people would be monitored for zika symptoms.

Dr Jack added that at this point WHO advice is not to stop the Olympics. She said that 60 countries have active zika transmission and that the risk of visiting Brazil is no greater than visiting any other country with active transmission. She said that current advice is that pregnant women not travel to countries with active zika transmission; others may travel, but are advised to take the recommended precautions to prevent being bitten by mosquitoes. It is advised that people are monitored for symptoms on return and that they abstain from sex or have safe sex for a month to prevent sexual transmission of zika.

(Last week a WHO spokesperson said that the Emergency Committee on zika will discuss concerns about zika and the Olympic Games at a meeting in June.)

Dr Tufton said that he will be giving a report on zika to Parliament on Tuesday,  June 7 and will give additional details during that report.

 

PS: Live Coverage of Media Briefing 

On the morning of the briefing, I called both the Jamaica Information Service (JIS) and the Public Broadcasting Corporation of Jamaica (PBCJ) to find out if either would be carrying live coverage of the event. I was very disappointed to find out that neither agency planned to do so.

I certainly appreciate the live coverage that did take place:

  • Minister Tufton carried the briefing live via Periscope on his Twitter account: @christufton
  • Jamaica News Network (part of the RJR Group) carried live coverage on television & online
  • Power106FM interrupted their regular programming to carry part of the briefing live.

It is not acceptable, however, that a public health briefing of this nature and importance was not carried live by either of the government broadcasting agencies.

 

 


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350 Words Or Less: Where Are We With #Zika Outbreak in #Jamaica?

Last night I was very puzzled when I took a look at PAHO/WHO’s Zika – Epidemiological Update  for April 28, 2016. These updates are posted weekly on their website.

paho who zika alerts page with border

PAHO/WHO Epidemiological Alerts and Updates

In the section on Incidence and Trends, the April 28 Update had the following about Jamaica:

paho who update 28-4-16 jamaica border

paho who update 28-4-16 jamaica A with border

Where exactly do we stand in terms of the Zika outbreak in Jamaica? This report seems to be saying that the outbreak here began in October 2015 (EW 39), when there was one reported suspected case. The highest number of suspected cases (162) was reported in the first week of February 2016 (EW5), with decreasing numbers of suspected cases susequently. Is this pattern agreed by the Ministry of Health (MOH)? If so, what does this mean in terms of expected incidence of zika? And if not, what does the MOH say about where we are in terms of the outbreak?

The number of suspected cases I have mentioned are taken from an interactive graph on the PAHO/WHO site. Pointing to each bar in the graph  gives the number of confirmed and suspected cases reported for that week.  PAHO/WHO interactive chart of suspected & confirmed Zika cases 

 

 

paho who interactive chart 28-4-16 update with borders

Unfortunately the MOH website doesn’t provide any such data. In a situation as rapidly changing as the zika outbreak is, it isn’t acceptable that the Ministry’s website isn’t being updated regularly in respect of this and other viruses (dengue and H1N1 influenza in particular) now circulating in Jamaica.

MOH representatives, including Minister Tufton, CMO Dr De La Haye and Director of Health Promotion and Protection Dr Copeland, seem to be readily available to the media, and are often heard giving updates. They share data about samples for testing and confirmed cases, etc. But this data is not posted to the website, where it can be accessed in more permanent form. The MOH website should be the go-to source for this kind of information.

NB As of today, there are still only 8 confirmed zika cases for Jamaica. But how many suspected cases are there? You can find a news report on Irie FM, for example, but not on the MOH website.

irie fm zika 5-5-16 copeland

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